The China Post news staff

For the longest time, Taiwan’s denizens have associated Beethoven’s “Fur Elise” as the garbage truck’s siren call to bring out their trash. However, the recent change of songs into a green, anti-noise pollution tune has been slow to register with the public, causing many to sprint towards the dumpsite in house slippers. Although the change was made in mid-August, the residents of Chaojhou Township in Pingtung County are tired of missing the garbage truck and demand that the government bring back “Fur Elise.” Li Wen-chao, a longtime resident of Chaojhou Township, described taking out the trash as a truly dirty chore, with neighbors running outside in their house slippers and some falling flat on their faces yet still missing the garbage truck.

According to a middle school teacher surnamed Liu, “Fur Elise” was perfect because of the way the song is sectioned. Once the first note hit, Liu knew to start gathering his trash from the living room, the kitchen, and the bathroom and then be out the door right as the truck was approaching. There was definite rhythm and structure in the entire garbage dumping process, Liu said. Li described the new song, which is sung by an artist, as infuriating, with lyrics translating as “Garbage, garbage, please don’t litter; Garbage, garbage, will give you a headache!” It makes your blood boil when you miss the truck and is forced to hear the sound of “garbage, garbage” echoing in the distance, Li said angrily. The Chaojhou Township Cleaning Unit admitted that there have been numerous complaints lodged and that it apologizes for the inconvenience. However, once the public gets used to it, it should become less of a problem, the unit spokesperson said. Although it has already been three months, doctors say the public has become conditioned to “Fur Elise” and once they re-adapt their aural senses to the new song, they will come around — in time for trash pickup.