French official urges gov’t support for digital art


CNA

TAIPEI, Taiwan — Digital technology has had an immense impact on artistic creation and the government should give support in this field as the wider society would benefit, a French official said at a seminar in Taipei yesterday.

Jean-Marc Prevost, an official from France’s Ministry of Culture, said that the use of advanced technology to create art has become the norm.

When singers no longer need record companies to release their albums, but instead publish their music online on their own, “we know artistic creation has taken a completely new turn,” he said at a three-day seminar titled “Artistic creation and digital technology.”

The French government is working closely with cultural centers to help create a vibrant environment for artists and allow the public to have easy access to the work of artists, he said.

“Through government support, we hope to provide public access to artistic creations and fulfill the concept of ‘the democratization of culture’ so that everyone has more opportunities to enjoy the cultural assets,” he added.

In recent years, the French government has been actively involved in the establishment of national cultural centers to better link artists with audiences, Prevost said.

These centers include Dispositif pour la Creation Artistique Multimedia (DICREAM), a trans-border institute established in 2001 to assist artists who are engaged in the creation of original digital art works, and Centre National du Livre (CNL), which is dedicated to digital and multimedia publication, he said.

Curator James Giroudon from the National Center for Musical Creation in Lyon, France said there are six national musical centers in France and the number will continue to grow.

“We are not saying all artists have to use high tech in their musical creations,” he said. “But the medium of technology is certainly the new tool to produce artworks, and we always need new perspectives on art.”

The seminar was organized by the Council for Cultural Affairs, which invited several keynote speakers, mostly from France, to share their views on how the arts could be reshaped through the application of digital technology.