Iran upbeat on nuclear talks, West still wary


By Justyna Pawlak and Fredrik Dahl | Reuters

ALMATY (Reuters) – Iran was upbeat on Wednesday after talks with world powers about its nuclear work ended with an agreement to meet again, but Western officials said it had yet to take concrete steps to ease their fears about its atomic ambitions.

Rapid progress was unlikely with Iran’s presidential election, due in June, raising domestic political tensions, diplomats and analysts had said ahead of the February 26-27 meeting in the Kazakh city of Almaty, the first in eight months.

The United States, China, France, Russia, Britain and Germany offered modest sanctions relief in return for Iran curbing its most sensitive nuclear work but made clear that they expected no immediate breakthrough.

In an attempt to make their proposals more palatable to Iran, the six powers appeared to have softened previous demands somewhat, for example regarding their requirement that the Islamic state ship out its stockpile of higher-grade uranium.

Iran’s chief nuclear negotiator Saeed Jalili said the powers had tried to “get closer to our viewpoint”, which he said was positive.

In Paris, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry commented that the talks had been “useful” and that a serious engagement by Iran could lead to a comprehensive deal in a decade-old dispute that has threatened to trigger a new Middle East war.

Iran’s foreign minister said in Vienna he was “very confident” an agreement could be reached and Jalili, the chief negotiator, said he believed the Almaty meeting could be a “turning point”.

However, one diplomat said Iranian officials at the negotiations appeared to be suggesting that they were opening new avenues, but it was not clear if this was really the case.

Iran expert Dina Esfandiary of the International Institute for Strategic Studies said: “Everyone is saying Iran was more positive and portrayed the talks as a win.”

“I reckon the reason for that is that they are saving face internally while buying time with the West until after the elections,” she said.

The two sides agreed to hold expert-level talks in Istanbul on March 18 to discuss the powers’ proposals, and return to Almaty for political discussions on April 5-6, when Western diplomats made clear they wanted to see a substantive response from Iran.

“Iran knows what it needs to do, the president has made clear his determination to implement his policy that Iran will not have a nuclear weapon,” Kerry said.

A senior U.S. official in Almaty said, “What we care about at the end is concrete results.”