Over 30% of new graduates anxious about careers: poll

Students make their ways on an unknown campus in this file photo. According to the Ministry of Labor, more than 30 percent of new high school and college graduates, express anxiety over their careers, irrespective of whether they have landed a job or are still looking. (NOWnews)

TAIPEI (CNA) — More than 30 percent of new high school and college graduates, irrespective of whether they have landed a job or are still looking, expressed anxiety over their careers, according to a survey released by the Workforce Development Agency (WDA) under the Ministry of Labor (MOL) on Friday.

The WDA cited the survey as saying 32.63 percent of respondents polled are anxious about their future, while 18.61 percent have no worries about their careers and the remaining 48.76 percent expressed no opinion.

Among those who expressed anxiety about their careers, 56.78 percent said they have no idea what kind of jobs they are best suited to do, 50.28 percent said they are worried they might not meet the job requirements and 23.73 percent are concerned their employers will be unhappy with their performance, the poll showed.

About 23.73 percent of those who expressed anxiety said they are concerned they will underperform their colleagues, the poll indicated.

Commenting on the survey, Chen Shih-chang (陳世昌), WDA section chief, said new graduates should explore their attitudes to work in a bid to find a job that suits them and gain a better idea of what sort of work they would like to do by taking advantage of job counseling services or taking an internship to learn more about themselves and the job market.

Chen said the MOL offers on-the-job training courses to new workers who want to sharpen their skills.

He urged new graduates to be open-minded and more upbeat about their careers.

The survey was conducted from Aug. 4-31, collecting 1,085 valid questionnaires from new graduates aged 30 or younger through the online recruitment platform: TaiwanJobs (台灣就業通), with a confidence level of 95 percent and a margin of error of plus or minus 2.95 percentage points. 

By Yu Hsiao-han and Frances Huang