Insurers get into care, but is it good for your health?

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Insurers get into care, but is it good for your health?
FILE- In this Dec. 4, 2017, file photo, the CVS Health logo appears above a trading post on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. Insurers are dropping billions of dollars on acquisitions and expansions as they get more involved in their customers’ health. Late last year, CVS Health announced a roughly $69 billion deal to buy another insurer, Aetna. Those companies plan to convert drugstores into health care hotspots that people can turn to for a variety of needs in between doctor visits. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)

Your health insurance, your prescription drugs and some of your treatment may come from the same company in the not-too-distant future.

Insurers are dropping billions of dollars on acquisitions and expansions in order to get more involved in customer health. They say this push can help cut costs and improve care.

That’s a huge potential benefit for employers and other customers stressed by rising health costs. But these deals also raise questions about whether the patient’s best interests — and not profits — will remain the focus as insurers dive deeper into care.

Economist Paul Keckley says insurers can earn trust simply by keeping people healthy for a reasonable price. But that will be a struggle for an industry in which the average patient has little faith.