Tariffs lift hopes for jobs in American mill towns

Tariffs lift hopes for jobs in American mill towns
FILE- In this Feb. 15, 2013, file photo, finished galvanized steel coils await shipment at ArcelorMittal Steel's hot dip galvanizing line in Cuyahoga Heights, Ohio. President Donald Trump’s tariffs are expected to raise prices for steel and aluminum in this country. That will help domestic producers and could create several hundred new steelworker jobs. (AP Photo/Mark Duncan, File)

There’s broad support for President Donald Trump’s import tariffs in the heart of Pennsylvania’s steel country, but it’s tempered with a streak of realism.

Tariffs are expected to raise prices for steel and aluminum in this country. That will help domestic producers and could create several hundred new steelworker jobs.

But the tariffs aren’t likely to return American steel anywhere close to its peak output in the 1970s.

Some countries will be exempted, at least temporarily. And the tariffs could be temporary, like steel tariffs that former President George W. Bush imposed in 2002.

Analysts say that makes it less likely that companies will make the huge technology investments needed to make older mills competitive in today’s lower-cost steel market.