The Latest: Family of slain man backs plan on police, guns

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The Latest: Family of slain man backs plan on police, guns
FILE - In this March 29, 2018, file photo, helmet-clad Sacramento Police officers stand near the entrance to the Golden 1 Center, before the Sacramento Kings host the Indiana Pacers in an NBA basketball game, in Sacramento, Calif. Recent demonstrations held outside the arena against the police shooting of Stephon Clark, who was unarmed, caused the lockdown of the building leaving thousands of ticket holders unable to attend some recent games. Sacramento Police Chief Daniel Hahn, the city's first black police chief, is an unlikely officer, growing up in a tough neighborhood of California's capital city and having his own early run-ins with police. He is struggling to find the right balance of reforms after the fatal shooting of Clark by his officers. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — The Latest on a proposal to change when police can use deadly force (all times local):

1:10 p.m.

The family of a 22-year-old unarmed black man fatally shot by Sacramento officers says a proposed California law could mean more young African-Americans survive confrontations with police.

Curtis Gordon, an uncle of Stephon Clark, is supporting the measure introduced Tuesday that would make California the first state to significantly restrict when officers can use their guns.

Officers could shoot only if there were no reasonable alternatives, such as first trying to defuse confrontations or using less-deadly weapons.

Assemblyman Chris Holden, chairman of the Legislative Black Caucus, says the legislation would rein in a “shoot-first, ask-questions-later police force.”

A police expert calls the proposal irresponsible and unworkable.

Two Sacramento officers say they fatally shot Clark because they mistakenly thought he had a gun.

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11:17 p.m.

Several state lawmakers and the family of a 22-year-old unarmed black man fatally shot by police want to make California the first to significantly restrict when officers can open fire.

Democratic Assembly members Shirley Weber and Kevin McCarty are proposing a bill Tuesday that would change the current “reasonable force” rule to “necessary force.”

The American Civil Liberties Union says it would mean officers could shoot only if there were no reasonable alternatives to using deadly force.

The goal is to encourage officers to defuse confrontations or use less-lethal weapons.

Law enforcement organizations aren’t immediately commenting.

The proposal comes after two Sacramento police officers chased Stephon Clark into his grandparents’ backyard. They say they shot at him because they thought he had a gun.

Investigators found only a cellphone.