The Latest: Kansas lawmakers try to break schools impasse

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The Latest: Kansas lawmakers try to break schools impasse
Kansas state Rep. Fred Patton, R-Topeka, makes a point during negotiations between the House and Senate on education funding legislation, Friday, April 6, 2018, at the Statehouse in Topeka, Kan. Legislators are facing a Kansas Supreme Court mandate to increase spending on public schools. (AP Photo/John Hanna).

TOPEKA, Kan. (AP) — The Latest on the Kansas Legislature’s debate on increasing school funding to meet a court mandate (all times local):

10:45 a.m.

Some Republican lawmakers in Kansas are trying to break an impasse over increasing funding for public schools to meet a court mandate.

GOP leaders in the House said they are hoping to have their chamber pass a new plan that’s close to one the chamber passed earlier to phase in a roughly million increase in education funding over five years.

If the House can pass the new plan, it would go to the Senate for a single, up-or-down vote to determine whether the measure goes to Republican Gov. Jeff Colyer.

The Senate previously approved a plan to phase in a million education funding increase over five years.

The state Supreme Court ruled in October that the state’s current funding of more than billion a year is insufficient.

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12:05 a.m.

Big differences among Republican lawmakers over how much to increase spending on Kansas’ public schools are forcing them to work the weekend.

They are under pressure Saturday to pass a plan that will satisfy a state Supreme Court mandate.

House and Senate negotiators held several rounds of talks Friday afternoon and evening to resolve the differences between their rival education funding plans.

But the talks broke off Friday night when it became clear that the negotiators weren’t getting closer to agreeing on how much to spend.

The House plan would phase in a roughly million increase in education funding over five years. The Senate’s figure is million.

The state Supreme Court ruled in October that the state’s current funding of more than billion a year is insufficient.