The Latest: Nurse gave CPR to injured woman until landing

The Latest: Nurse gave CPR to injured woman until landing
In this Tuesday, April 17, 2018 photo, a National Transportation Safety Board investigator examines damage to the engine of the Southwest Airlines plane that made an emergency landing at Philadelphia International Airport in Philadelphia. A preliminary examination of the blown jet engine of the Southwest Airlines plane that set off a terrifying chain of events and left a businesswoman hanging half outside a shattered window showed evidence of "metal fatigue," according to the National Transportation Safety Board. (NTSB via AP)

PHILADELPHIA (AP) — The Latest on the plane that made an emergency landing in Philadelphia (all times local):

9:35 a.m.

A retired registered school nurse says she performed CPR on the woman who passengers say was partially sucked out of the window of a Southwest Airlines plane that had been hit by engine debris.

Officials say Jennifer Riordan of Albuquerque, New Mexico, died after the plane heading from New York’s LaGuardia Airport to Dallas made an emergency landing Tuesday in Philadelphia.

Peggy Phillips spoke to WFAA-TV upon her arrival in Dallas Tuesday night. She says shortly after takeoff there was a loud noise and the plane started shaking like it was “coming apart.”

She says they started losing altitude and the masks came down.

She heard a lot of commotion a few rows behind her, noise and a whoosh of air and calls for someone who knew CPR.

She says she and an EMT lay the woman down and performed CPR for about 20 minutes, until the plane made an emergency landing in Philadelphia.

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4:50 a.m.

The National Transportation Safety Board says a preliminary examination of the blown jet engine of the Southwest Airlines plane that set off a terrifying chain of events showed evidence of “metal fatigue.”

One person was killed and seven others were injured after the twin-engine 737 blew an engine at 30,000 feet Tuesday and got hit by shrapnel that smashed a window. The plane from New York to Dallas landed in Philadelphia.

In a late night news conference, NTSB chairman Robert Sumwalt said one of the engine’s fan blades was separated and missing. The blade was separated at the point where it would come into the hub and there was evidence of metal fatigue.

As a precaution, Southwest says it will inspect similar engines in its fleet over the next 30 days.