The Latest: Multiple failures played part in school massacre

The Latest: Multiple failures played part in school massacre
FILE - In this Wednesday, Feb. 14, 2018, file photo, a family reunites following a shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla. A commission tasked with investigating government actions surrounding the Florida high school massacre and the state’s other mass shootings is set to hold its first meeting, Tuesday, April 24. (John McCall/South Florida Sun-Sentinel via AP, File)

COCONUT CREEK, Fla. (AP) — The Latest on the commission investigating the Florida high school massacre (all times local):

11:15 a.m.

A commission investigating the Florida high school massacre has learned that faulty classroom designs and police radio and 911 systems contributed to the chaos and possibly to some of the 17 deaths.

The Broward Sheriff’s Office told the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School Public Safety Commission at its first meeting Tuesday that teachers couldn’t lock their classroom doors from the inside as they tried to lock down their students Feb. 14. They had to open their doors and use a key to lock them from the outside.

The doors also had small windows, allowing the gunman to fire into the locked classrooms.

Broward sheriff’s radios were not on the same channel as Coral Springs police, the two primary agencies that responded. Attempts to merge the radio channels failed, preventing the two departments from sharing information. Coral Springs and Broward are also on separate 911 systems. Calls were coming into both.

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9 a.m.

A commission is investigating how law enforcement and other state agencies responded to a deadly shooting at a Florida high school.

The Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School Public Safety Commission held its first meeting Tuesday. The 16 members appointed by Gov. Rick Scott will question school and mental health officials. They also will hear from the Broward Sheriff’s Office about how it handled the Feb. 14 shooting that left 17 dead and 17 wounded.

Commission members include law enforcement administrators, education officials, a state senator, a mental health counselor and the fathers of victims Alex Schachter, Meadow Pollack and Aliana Petty. The members were appointed by Scott, state House Speaker Richard Corcoran and Senate President Joe Negron.

The commission’s final report is due Jan. 1.