Something new to binge-watch: TV's rich history of itself

Something new to binge-watch: TV's rich history of itself
FILE - In this Feb. 3, 2018 file photo, Judd Apatow arrives at the 70th annual Directors Guild of America Awards in Beverly Hills, Calif. A collection of 4,000 hours of video interviews recorded over more than two decades by the Television Academy Foundation will be available for free on a website. Apatow made use of footage from a Garry Shandling interview for a documentary released this year about the late comedian. The clips were licensed from the foundation, one of the ways it generates money to preserve and expand the archive's collection. (Photo by Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP, File)

LOS ANGELES (AP) — There’s something new to binge-watch: an online collection of video interviews with the people who founded TV and those making it today.

The interviews numbering almost 900 have been collected over more than two decades by the Television Academy Foundation, the philanthropic arm of the TV academy.

On Wednesday, a new website will make the full collection, titled The Interviews: An Oral History of Television, available free to all comers.

Filmmaker Judd Apatow counts himself a fan of the archive and the in-depth interviews he calls the definitive record of people’s careers.

The interviewees represent past and present and a wide range of TV professions, from actors to executives to makeup artists.

The archive is searchable in a variety of ways, including by names, shows and topics.