Sun Anzou pleads guilty in U.S. terrorism threat case, U.S. unsure when he will return

Sun Anzuo officially confessed to making terroristic threats. The court laid in severe penalties, but agreed to transfer the case for federal management. However, the Federal authorities are still allowed to sue Sun Anzuo for illegally acquiring weaponry. Whether or not Sun Anzou would return to Taiwan or when he will return is still unknown. (CNA file photo)

by Anne Huang

Pennsylvania, June 4 – Sun Anzuo, son of actor Sun Peng and actress Di Yin exited the court Monday, officially confessing to making terroristic threats. The court laid in severe penalties, but agreed to transfer the case for federal management. However, the Federal authorities are still allowed to sue Sun Anzuo for illegally acquiring weaponry. Whether or not Sun Anzou would return to Taiwan or when he will return is still unknown.

Sun Anzou was arrested on March 26th by the American police force, after his school classmate apprised the authorities, believing that Sun Anzou was planning a possible school shooting at their current high school on May 1st. But Sun Anzou later on expressed how he was just bluffing and joking. After Sun Anzou’s threat, the police force searched his homestay house at the beginning of April, uncovering handguns, crossbows, and over 1600 bullets. Through this, the legal prosecutors later on added charges of possession of criminal gadgets and possible intentions of committing a felony.

CNA file photo

The Pretrial Conference took place at 2 pm on Tuesday in the Delaware County Intermediate Penal Court. Sun Anzou exited the court in cuffs, with a black-framed sunglasses and a light grey sweater inside a dark blue jacket.

Di Yin and Sun Peng along with lawyers and friends were already in court waiting for the pre-trial ten minutes before it officially started. This was their first public appearance since their first arrival to the United States. The two was attentively listening, with serious and almost unreadable expressions. The Di Yin inside the court can be seen with red eyes patently due to extensive crying.

Following the agreement both sides had previously accommodated on, Sun Anzou plead guilty in court with terroristic threatening. The prosecutors then revocated their original prosecution of criminal intent to commit crimes.

According to the law of Pennsylvania, terroristic threatening falls under misdemeanor of the first degree, which when most severe could include five years behind bars and a ten-thousand dollars fine. Following the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania sentencing guidelines, in view of Sun Anzou’s original records, the judge allowed the lightest sentencing, which in that case, the worst can only be four months behind bars.

Many evidences were used and shown in the court, including the statement Sun Anzous’ original disclosure with his classmate on his threats to undertake a school shooting.  Later on, the police brought forth the weapons they disinterred in his homestay house, which of course included a wide variety of firearms, explosives and bullets, crossbows, and bulletproof vests. They also unveiled his original testimony when he was first arrested that he did not have any weaponry in his house, which of course was later on proved to be a lie. The prosecutor also brought a witness from the school, promulgating how there was a student who used “unsafe campus” as an excuse to refuse to return to campus for school the following year.

Sun Anzou’s defense attorney Robert Kelly asked Sun Peng to talk with Judge Barry C. Dozor to speak in Sun Anzou’s defense. Peng Sung in English plead “I really miss my son, I hope he can come home. He was just an immature child, he didn’t know he was in trouble”.

Actor Sun Peng and actress Di Yin exited the court Monday. (Photo courtesy of CNA)

Sun Anzou then read out to the judge his pre-prepared statement, stating his remorse for his actions, and how his mistake brought such shamefulness and embarrassment upon his supporters and family.  He also emphasized how guilty and ashamed he is, stating how he wish incidents like this will never happen again.

Kelly also suggested the case to be transferred to the federal government, in order to resolve Sun Anzou’s Non-US citizen possession of weaponry legal problem, and get him out of American soil as soon as possible.

Dozor had pointed out multiple times in the pretrial how he does not want to delay Sun Anzou’s deportation, which is why the case is given to Federal to manage in the first place. He hoped that after Sun Anzou returns to Taiwan, he can focus more on making good choices and doing positive things and contribute to society.

The pretrial conference ended in 52 minutes, with Sun Anzou remanded in prison. Sun Peng and Di Yin exited the court and was immediately surrounded by a massive crowd of reporters. Following Kelly’s suggestion, the two remained completely unresponsive to any of the questions, with only Sun Peng saying “everyone has been working hard, thank you”.

When Kelly exited the court and was approached with questions on the “reasonable” result of the trial, he said the judge already convicted and agreed to let the Federal Agency take over the case. After considering both side’s circumstances, it was decided that Sun Anzou would not need to stay in local prison for the rest of the trial period. The federal however might still charge Sun Anzou illegally obtaining weaponry. But it’s just a “short process”, so it shouldn’t create more necessary trials.

Because Sun Peng and Di Yin’s visa would expire in June, they wish to have Sun Anzou return to Taiwan with them. If that was to happen, the U.S procedures for deportation must be completed within the next 3 weeks. Kelly said that if the federal agency takes any longer than that, Sun Anzou’s return to Taiwan in June would be in jeopardy.

When asked if the case would be concluded through a plea bargain, Kelly said that it is an unofficial open plea case. In other words, the attorney lawyer had already reached an agreement with the prosecuting team on the crime of confession, but the judge ultimately decides the verdict.