Taiwan Today: ‘Taiwan’ to be used at future sports events, Keeping death penalty undecided

Chi Cheng said that athletes will one day be able to attend international sports events under the name Taiwan.

Olympian calls for ‘Taiwan’ to be used at future sports events

Taiwanese Olympic medalist Chi Cheng (紀政), expressed her hope Wednesday that local athletes will one day be able to attend international sports events under the name Taiwan.

Chi, 74, is one of the initiators of a referendum campaign asking people if they support the nation attending the 2020 Tokyo Olympics under the name Taiwan. Chi said she wants Taiwanese athletes to have the right to hold high a banner bearing the name “Taiwan” as she did in the 1960s.

Chi took part in the Olympic Games in 1960, 1964 and 1968 and won a bronze medal in the women’s 80-meter hurdles at the 1968 Mexico City Olympics.

Keeping death penalty undecided: new justice minister

Whether executions will continue to be carried out in Taiwan remains undecided, as no consensus has been reached, new Justice Minister Tsai Ching-hsiang (蔡清祥) said at a
press conference Wednesday.

Justice Minister Tsai Ching-hsiang declined to reveal his personal stance on the death penalty, saying only that whether execution should be an option should be considered in terms of the rule of law and public opinion.

Tsai, who replaced Chiu Tai-san (邱太三) last week, reiterated that there is no timeframe for the issue.

The death penalty is to be gradually abolished in Taiwan, and that policy remains unchanged, Tsai said.

Transport minister calls for airline workers to give notice of strikes

Transport and Communications Minister Wu Hong-mo (吳宏謀) on Wednesday proposed that labor unions give “reasonable advance notice” of planned strikes, particularly in the
case of commercial airline workers.

Under Taiwan’s labor laws, union members have the legal right to go on strike if 50 percent of their eligible members vote on the proposal and the majority votes in favor of it.

Wu told CNA that he planned to discuss the proposal with Labor Minister Hsu Ming-chun (許銘春), when Hsu returns from his current overseas visit.

“Workers have their right to strike, but those in the public transportation sector should also consider their social responsibility and national security,” which should not be compromised in negotiations between labor and management, said Wu, who was appointed transportation minister just over a week ago in a Cabinet reshuffle.

His comment came against the backdrop of a recent decision by some 800 pilots of China Airlines (CAL) and 500 of EVA Airways to hold a vote in the period July 16 to Aug. 6 to decide whether to stage a walkout, after they failed to reach an agreement with their respective management teams over the matter of overtime and other issues.

Taiwan to hold international indigenous music festival

An international indigenous music festival will be held Aug. 3-4 by the Council of Indigenous Peoples (CIP) in Taitung, southeastern Taiwan, with indigenous music groups from seven countries participating, according to a statement released Wednesday
by the CIP.

Speaking at a press conference in Taipei, CIP Minister Icyang Parod (夷將•拔路兒) said the festival will allow the music groups from different indigenous cultures to have the chance to perform together and appreciate each other’s lifestyles.

Chief secretary of the Taiwan Railway Administration (TRA), Chu Lai-shun (朱來順), who also attended the press conference, said the TRA will add extra train services during the festival.

Taiwan will reach out to world despite Chinese pressure: president

Taiwan’s resolution to reach out to the world will not change, President Tsai Ing-wen (蔡英文) said Wednesday in response to the cancellation of the East Asian Youth Games in
Taichung in 2019 under pressure from Beijing.

The expanding influence of China on military and diplomatic relations might pose severe threats to the safety of East Asia and increase tension in the region, President Tsai Ing-wen warned.

The president made the remark when meeting with foreign scholars attending the Ketagalan Forum: 2018 Asia-Pacific Security Dialogue hosted by the Prospect Foundation, a local think tank.

Tsai said it is regrettable that the Chinese government has been challenging the global order as well as the values of freedom and democracy with its expanding economic power and “sharp power.”

The term of sharp power was coined by the U.S.-based National Endowment for Democracy in 2017 to denote authoritarian regimes’ manipulation of information and political environments in the target countries, according to the website of the U.S.-based think tank.

The expanding influence of China on military and diplomatic relations might pose severe threats to the safety of East Asia and increase tension in the region, Tsai warned.