The Latest: Prosecutors detail how they built Manafort case

The Latest: Prosecutors detail how they built Manafort case
Kevin Downing, left, and Thomas Zehnle, attorneys for Paul Manafort, walk to the Alexandria Federal Courthouse in Alexandria, Va., Friday, Aug. 3, 2018, on day four of President Donald Trump's former campaign chairman Paul Manafort's tax evasion and bank fraud trial. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

ALEXANDRIA, Va. (AP) — The Latest on testimony in the trial of former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort (all times local):

11:30 a.m.

Prosecutors are giving more insight into how they built their case against former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort.

Attorneys for special counsel Robert Mueller’s team say in a court filing that an FBI forensic accountant reviewed “tens of thousands” of documents from 20 financial institutions and 35 companies to support the tax evasion and bank fraud charges against Manafort.

They say that hidden among those records were more than 200 wire transfers from more than 30 companies Manafort controlled. Among those were seven transfers the government says were sham “loans” Manafort used to disguise millions in income from the IRS.

Prosecutors laid out the details of their work in asking a judge to let them use charts to summarize the complex financial case in the fourth day of Manafort’s trial.

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5 a.m.

Prosecutors are heading toward the heart of their financial fraud case against former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort. Jurors are expected to hear testimony Friday that Manafort never told his tax accountants about offshore bank accounts containing millions of dollars.

The testimony of longtime accountant Philip Ayliff would build on evidence presented by special counsel Robert Mueller’s team that Manafort inflated his business income by millions of dollars and kept his bookkeeper in the dark about the foreign bank accounts he was using to buy luxury items and pay personal expenses.

Bookkeeper Heather Washkuhn testified Thursday that Manafort approved “every penny” of the personal bills she paid for him and was very knowledgeable about his finances. But he never told her that millions in foreign wire transfers were coming from companies prosecutors say he controlled.