Taiwan Today: Virus not result of deliberate attack, Man given life sentence for killing brother

The virus outbreak was a "mistake by TSMC itself," said CEO C.C. Wei (魏哲家), who is also the vice chairman of the world's largest contract chipmaker, at a press briefing.

Virus not result of deliberate attack: TSMC CEO

A computer virus that hit Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co. (TSMC) was not caused by a hacker or an employee with a grudge, the company’s CEO said Monday, responding to rumors that TSMC was hit by a cyberattack.

The virus outbreak was a “mistake by TSMC itself,” said CEO C.C. Wei (魏哲家), who is also the vice chairman of the world’s largest contract chipmaker, at a press briefing.

It occurred when a new tool was connected to the company’s computer network without having been isolated first to be checked for viruses as a precaution, Wei said.

Having installed more than 10,000 fab tools in the past, TSMC “very much regretted” that such negligence would happen, he said.

Because humans inevitably make mistakes, Wei said TSMC will install an automatic checking system to ensure that such an incident does not repeat itself in the future.

Man given life sentence for killing brother, stealing identity

A 48-year old man who confessed to murdering his brother, chopping off his hands and stealing his identity in an attempt to avoid jail and defraud an insurance company was sentenced to life imprisonment Monday by Taichung District Court.

The man, surnamed Lin (林姓男子), got into debt and was involved in multiple lawsuits after his company went bankrupt. To avoid being sent to prison, he decided to kill his brother and steal his identity.

On June 1 last year, Lin asked his brother out for a drink and, after getting him drunk, took him to a redevelopment site where he killed him.

In order to misdirect the police investigation, Lin left his own driving license and ten dice at the crime scene, chopped off his brother’s hands and burned the body.

Lawmakers warn against rash response to name change by airlines

Opposition Kuomintang (KMT) lawmakers issued warnings Monday over measures reportedly being planned by the government in retaliation against foreign airlines that acceded to China’s demand they change Taiwan’s designation on their websites.

Speaking at a press conference in the Legislative Yuan, KMT legislative caucus secretary-general Tseng Ming-chung (曾銘宗) first protested China’s move which he said has adversely impacted the convenience and safety of Taiwanese air travelers.

However, Tseng urged the Ministry of Transportation and Communications (MOTC) to be cautious when mulling countermeasures against 44 foreign aviation companies identified as doing China’s bidding.

The comments came in response to a United Daily News report Monday
that the government is considering adjusting the airline’s time slots at Taiwan’s airports and denying them the use of jet bridges for caving in to China’s request that Taiwan be listed as part of China.

Questioning whether the countermeasures have been fully thought through, Tseng warned that the proposals will only cause greater inconvenience to passengers, mostly Taiwanese, and hurt Taiwan’s image.

Taiwan’s government is considering adjusting the airline’s time slots at Taiwan’s airports and denying them the use of jet bridges for caving in to China’s request that Taiwan be listed as part of China.

12 Taiwanese visitors in Lombok safe after strong quake: officials

Twelve Taiwanese tourists who were in Lombok, Indonesia when a magnitude 7.0 earthquake stuck on Sunday are all safe and are in the process of being evacuated, Taiwan’s Tourism Bureau said Monday.

None of the 12 independent Taiwanese travelers were injured in the powerful earthquake and there were no tour groups from Taiwan in Lombok, a popular tourist destination, at the time, the bureau said.

It said Taiwan’s representative office in Surabaya, Indonesia, was making arrangements for the evacuation of the 12 Taiwanese.

According to foreign news wires, the quake, recorded at magnitude 7.0 by the U.S. Geological Survey, has killed at least 91 people, wounded hundreds, and left thousands of buildings damaged.

The Indonesian National Board for Disaster Management had issued a  tsunami warning at one point, but later lifted it.

On July 29, Lombok was struck by a magnitude 6.4 earthquake that left 17 people dead.