The Latest: Crews boost containment of California wildfire

The Latest: Crews boost containment of California wildfire
FILE - In this Wednesday, Nov. 14, 2018, file photo, Sheriff's deputies recover the bodies of multiple Camp fire victims at the Holly Hills Mobile Estates residence in Paradise, Calif. Searchers are in a race against time with long-awaited rains expected in the Northern California fire zone where dozens of bodies have been recovered so far. While the rain is good for tamping down the still-burning fire, it will turn the fire zone into a muddy mess and make it more difficult for crews to search. (AP Photo/Noah Berger, File)

PARADISE, Calif. (AP) — The Latest on California wildfires (all times local):

7:20 a.m.

Fire officials say the Northern California wildfire that killed at least 77 people continues to burn in rugged terrain but that firefighters have managed to boost their containment of the blaze.

The California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection said Monday that the fire is now 66 percent contained. That’s up from 60 percent Sunday morning and represents a slight increase from the 65 percent containment reported Sunday night.

The fire has charred 236 square miles (611 square kilometers) since it ignited Nov. 8 near Paradise, a town of 27,000 that was leveled.

Butte County Sheriff Kory Honea said Sunday that about 1,000 names remain on a list of people who have not been located.

Rain is forecast for Wednesday in the Paradise area, which could help the 5,000 firefighters battling the blaze make more progress.

But officials say they worry rain could complicate the efforts of the crews searching for human remains.

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12 a.m.

Rain in the forecast could bring relief for those working to tame a devastating Northern California fire and frustration for those searching for remains of victims.

The search for bodies or bone fragments left behind in the so-called Camp Fire took on new urgency Sunday.

Hundreds of searchers fanned out to poke through the ashen rubble in Paradise before rains can wash away signs of the dead or turn the dusty debris into a thick paste.

Authorities say at least 77 people have died in the deadliest U.S. wildfire in a century.

Search teams in white coveralls, hard hats and masks used sticks to move aside debris and focused on vehicles, bathtubs and what was left of mattresses while a cadaver dog sniffed for clues.