The Latest: Florida massacre panel considers recommendations

The Latest: Florida massacre panel considers recommendations
FILE - In this Wednesday, Feb. 14, 2018 file photo, students are evacuated by police from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., after a shooter opened fire on the campus. There were plenty of missteps in communication, security and school policy before and during the Florida high school massacre that allowed the gunman to kill 17 people. The Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School Public Safety Commission will consider proposals Wednesday, Dec. 12, 2018, and Thursday, Dec. 13, including whether to arm trained teachers who volunteer. (Mike Stocker/South Florida Sun-Sentinel via AP, File)

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) — The Latest on the commission that is investigating the Florida high school massacre (all times local):

10:15 a.m.

The commission investigating the Florida high school massacre is wading through dozens of findings and recommendations that members hope will prevent future shootings.

The Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School Public Safety Commission began a two-day meeting Wednesday with a discussion on findings that contributed to the Feb. 14 shooting that left 17 dead.

The commission discussed security lapses that allowed suspect Nikolas Cruz to enter the school, including unlocked and unstaffed gates and doors.

The members will also consider arming security on all campuses, with explicit orders to confront shooters; improving communication systems on campus; and imposing more statewide uniformity in how troubled students are identified and helped.

The commission must file its initial report to Gov. Rick Scott, incoming Gov. Ron DeSantis and the Legislature by Jan. 1.

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12:30 a.m.

There were plenty of missteps in communication, security and school policy before and during the Florida high school massacre that allowed the gunman to kill 17 people. Now, the state commission investigating the shooting will consider a long list of recommendations addressing these problems statewide.

The Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School Public Safety Commission will consider proposals Wednesday and Thursday, including whether to arm trained teachers who volunteer.

The members will also consider arming security on all campuses, with explicit orders to confront shooters; improving communication systems on campus; and imposing more statewide uniformity in how troubled students are identified and helped.

The commission, created weeks after the Feb. 14 shooting, must file its initial report to Gov. Rick Scott, incoming Gov. Ron DeSantis and the Legislature by Jan. 1.