Technology brings images of Holocaust survivors to life

Technology brings images of Holocaust survivors to life
This August 2018 photo shows Holocaust survivor Max Glauben sitting in an interactive green screen room while filming a piece for the Dallas Holocaust Museum in Dallas. Glauben will be the latest to have his story recorded in such a way that generations to come will be able to ask his image questions. Glauben, who turns 91 on Monday, had lost his mother, father and brother at the hands of the Nazis when U.S. troops rescued him while he was on a death march. (McGuire Boles/Dallas Holocaust Museum via AP)

DALLAS (AP) — A Dallas man is the latest Holocaust survivor to have his story recorded in such a way that generations to come will be able to ask his image questions.

Max Glauben lost his mother, father and brother at the hands of the Nazis.

The University of Southern California Shoah Foundation has recorded 18 interactive testimonies with Holocaust survivors over the last several years. The images are currently being shown at museums in Illinois, Ohio, New York and Texas.

Executive director Stephen Smith says the foundation is in a “race against time” as it works to get more recordings.

Glauben was 17 when he U.S. troops rescued him while he was on a death march at the end of World War II. He turns 91 on Monday.