To slow flow of grad transfers, NCAA could constrain schools

To slow flow of grad transfers, NCAA could constrain schools
FILE - In this July 25, 2018, file photo, Stanford head coach David Shaw speaks at the Pac-12 Conference NCAA college football Media Day in Los Angeles. The NCAA’s Division I Council meets this week in Indianapolis, and it is expected to vote by Friday, April 19, 2019, on an amendment to the rules regarding graduate transfers and financial aid. If passed the proposal would require a grad transfer to count against a team’s scholarship total for two years no matter how much eligibility the player has remaining. Shaw, whose program routinely operates below the major-college maximum of 85 scholarship players, said he would not hesitate to bring in a star-level player as a grad transfer even if it meant having an vacant scholarship the next season. But teams could be less inclined to take that hit with a lesser player. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong, File)

Football and basketball coaches may less likely to add graduate transfers to their teams under a change being considered by the NCAA.

The NCAA Division I Council is expected to vote by Friday on an amendment that would require a grad transfer to count against a team’s scholarship total for two years, no matter how much eligibility the player has left when they arrive. An exception would be made for athletes who complete graduate degree requirements before the start of the second year.

The proposal targets what critics say is virtual free agency in big-time college athletics. Current rules allow athletes who have earned an undergraduate degree to transfer to another school without sitting out a season, as is usually required by the NCAA of undergraduates.

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