Marines go through ‘Paradise Road’ on the last leg of ‘Conquer Week’

The training opened with a dip in cold water and a sip of bitter tea, after which trainees departed from Sizihwan in Kaohsiung carrying a 146-kg dinghy on their head in addition to their own equipment. (NOWnews)

TAIPEI (The China Post/ANN) – The 148th Marine Corps amphibious reconnaissance specialty program kick-started on May 10.

The comprehensive training program, also known as “Conquer Week” for spanning over six days and five nights, ended yesterday with the infamous “Paradise Road” test.

The training opened with a dip in cold water and a sip of bitter tea, after which trainees departed from Sizihwan in Kaohsiung carrying a 146-kg dinghy on their head in addition to their own equipment.

Marines for sure have excellent swimming skills so on the third day, trainees conducted water course contests such as floating, deep diving, armed swimming, water rescue, flat diving, and armed swimming. (NOWnews)

In order to further enhance their combative spirit and leadership skills, two teams were facing each other during the test.

Marines for sure have excellent swimming skills so on the third day, trainees conducted water course contests such as floating, deep diving, armed swimming, water rescue, flat diving, and armed swimming.

Among the challenges, the flat and deep dive tests were the hardest for the tired trainees. The dive consisted into reaching the bottom of a pool and swimming 35 meters in one breath.

The deep dive was based on the same principle, but trainees had to dive at sea to pick up their training guns.

The Marine Corps strict training is world-famous. BBC Two accompanied the Marine Corps Amphibious Investigation Team in 2017 to film a documentary on the “Paradise Road,” the last leg of the “Conquer Week.” (NOWnews)

On the fourth day of the training, trainees went through various terrains. They had to use tactical movements to open grounds, search buildings, and move through various terrains with the support of other frogmen.

On the last day, the “Paradise Road” required trainees to crawl on a 50-meter-long path filled with rocks and corals as well as complete a variety of exercises along the way.

Trainees had to roll, crawl, flip, squat, as well as perform frog exercises, including prone swimming, supine watering, prone, leg movements, back movements, as well as lying on their abdomen and back.

Because passing through the test is like hell before heaven, the test is, therefore, called “Paradise Road.”

The Marine Corps strict training is world-famous. BBC Two accompanied the Marine Corps Amphibious Investigation Team in 2017 to film a documentary on the “Paradise Road,” the last leg of the “Conquer Week,” that was broadcast on Aug. 31, 2018.