Kaohsiung reports six new indigenous dengue fever cases

Six new indigenous cases of dengue fever have been confirmed in Kaohsiung, southern Taiwan, including a cluster of five cases, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) said on June 2. (NOWnews)

TAIPEI (CNA) – Six new indigenous cases of dengue fever have been confirmed in Kaohsiung, southern Taiwan, including a cluster of five cases, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) said on June 2.

The six new patients, three men and three women, are between the ages of 40-70 and live in the city’s Sanmin District, including five in the same alley, according to the CDC.

None of the new patients traveled overseas and were admitted to hospitals between May 27-30. They were all found to have the dengue virus type 4 (DENV-4) strain and are still being treated for the illness, according to the CDC.

The confirmation of the six most recent dengue fever cases brings the total number of indigenous cases this year to eight across the country, all living in Kaohsiung, including seven in Sanmin District.

Health authorities have disinfected the residences of the patients and neighborhood where they live to help prevent the further spread of the virus and will investigate the outbreak, according to the CDC.

Meanwhile, Kaohsiung Mayor Han Kuo-yu (韓國瑜) said Sunday that as the weather is getting warmer, he has instructed health and environmental personnel to ramp up disinfection efforts in the fight to prevent dengue fever.

Han also called on local residents to help prevent the disease from spreading by keeping their living quarters clean of stagnant water, where mosquitoes like to breed.

A total of 153 imported dengue fever cases have been reported in Taiwan this year, the highest in 10 years over the same period. Most of the imported cases have been from Southeast Asian countries, including Indonesia (55) and Vietnam (32), according to the CDC. ●

By Yu Hsiao-han and Evelyn Kao