TSMC research center project passes environmental impact assessment

At Wednesday's meeting, executives of the Hsinchu Science Park suggested that the center be built in terraced design with retaining walls on the hillside. (NOWnews)
At Wednesday's meeting, executives of the Hsinchu Science Park suggested that the center be built in terraced design with retaining walls on the hillside. (NOWnews)

TAIPEI (CNA) — Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co. (TSMC) is expected to begin construction of a research and development center by the end of year, following the government’s approval on July 10 of the environmental impact assessment (EIA) of the project.

At an evaluation meeting, the Environmental Protection Administration (EPA) signed off on the EIA of the center, which will be built on hillside land in Hsinchu County, executives at the Hsinchu Science Park (HSP) told reporters.

The project had failed the first EIA due to environmental concerns and the potential impact on the traffic situation.

At Wednesday’s meeting however, executives of the Hsinchu Science Park, which will be responsible for the project’s development, suggested that the center be built in terraced design with retaining walls on the hillside.

In terms of vehicular traffic, the HSP said, it will draft a plan based on population and vehicle growth over the past decade.

Regarding the environmental issues, the HSP said, precious plants and trees more than 50cm in diameter will either be preserved or transplanted, while 3,000 trees native to Taiwan will be planted in the area.

Meanwhile, TSMC said it is currently working with Pingtung County to draft a plan to build a solar power plant to supply green energy to the R&D center.

The disaster preparation plans will include the installation of three real time detection devices that will shut down the center in the event of a major earthquake the company said.

Having cleared the environmental impact assessment, TSMC said, it expects to start construction of the center before the end of the year and have it operational before the end of 2020.

By Chang Hsiung-feng and Emerson Lim