14 Taipei preschools fined for violating regulations

Taipei City government has fined 14 private preschools for breaching city regulations and rules governing preschool education and care, including over-enrollment, with one school admitting 106 students more than allowed. (Shutterstock)
Taipei City government has fined 14 private preschools for breaching city regulations and rules governing preschool education and care, including over-enrollment, with one school admitting 106 students more than allowed. (Shutterstock)

TAIPEI (CNA) — Taipei City government has fined 14 private preschools for breaching city regulations and rules governing preschool education and care, including over-enrollment, with one school admitting 106 students more than allowed.

The city government inspected 147 preschools in the city regarding public safety management from January to the end of September and fined 14 for breaching relevant regulations and rules, while instructing them to make improvements within a set period of time.

After follow up checks, it was found that five schools had made the necessary improvements, eight have been instructed to make further improvements and one was fined last year but failed to make any improvements and so was fined again, Taipei City’s Consumer Protection Officer Kung Chien-ya (龔千雅) said Thursday at a press conference.

Examples of rule violations included hiring unlicensed preschool educators, over-enrollment, use of unlicensed classrooms and failure to meet student-instructor ratio requirements, said Hsu Hua-hsien (徐華鮮), a city education department official.

Among those ordered to make improvements, a preschool affiliated with Hess International Educational Group and Karl Witte Montessori School in Donghu were fined NT$438,000 (US$14,590) and NT$237,000 for over-enrollment and other violations, according to Hsu.

During a recent re-examination, Karl Witte Montessori School in Donghu was found to have not taken action to fix the problems originally identified, given a further fine and ordered to suspend student enrollment for one year, she added.

Noting that over-enrollment can constrain students activities due to limited space, Hsu said that schools found to be over-enrolled should return a portion of tuition and fees to parents.

(By Liu Chien-pang and Evelyn Kao)