Hong Kong-Taiwan playwright seeks to stage play about HK protests

Stefani Kuo (郭佳怡), a Hong Kong-Taiwanese playwright living in New York, is seeking to stage a play about the Hong Kong protests in the hope of sharing the pain and determination of the Hong Kong people as they fight for democracy. (YouTube: stefkuo)
Stefani Kuo (郭佳怡), a Hong Kong-Taiwanese playwright living in New York, is seeking to stage a play about the Hong Kong protests in the hope of sharing the pain and determination of the Hong Kong people as they fight for democracy. (YouTube: stefkuo)

SAN FRANCISCO (CNA) — Stefani Kuo (郭佳怡), a Hong Kong-Taiwanese playwright living in New York, is seeking to stage a play about the Hong Kong protests in the hope of sharing the pain and determination of the Hong Kong people as they fight for democracy.

A graduate of Yale University in Theatre Studies, 24-year old Kuo is a playwright, poet and actor. She is currently a member of the writers group Interstate 73 with Page 73.

In an interview with CNA, Kuo said that she wrote the play to “let Hongkongers feel their story, and let Americans see Hong Kong’s story.”

Learning what is happening in Hong Kong through a play could be more impactful to the audience than reading it in the news, she said.

If fundraising goes smoothly, the play could be staged as early as next year, she added.

Besides the play, Kuo has also used other methods to try to call attention to what is happening in Hong Kong.

She runs a blog titled “Parachute Hong Konger”, and has recently written a poem titled “2047”, referencing the year when the “one country, two systems” policy by which Hong Kong is theoretically governed expires.

“I was born in 1995 in British colonial Hong Kong and most of my life has been a ticking time bomb of censorship and surveillance, autocracy and propaganda,” she said in a Youtube video of her reciting the poem.

Wearing black, the unofficial uniform of the protesters, she condemned the lack of action taken to help Hong Kong and other regions threatened by China.

“No nation bold enough to forgo Chinese money for humanity, to stand up for murdered Muslims or the sovereignty of Taiwan, fight to free Tibet or teenagers dying on the streets of Hong Kong,” she said.

Even though U.S. President Donald Trump signed the Hong Kong Human Rights and Democracy Act of 2019 into law late November, Kuo told CNA that she thinks the U.S. is still seeking to please China for investment, trade and economic development.

She concluded her poem with an imaginary scene of 327 million Americans standing up to say to Hong Kong, “We are going to make sure you survive.”

Through her work, Kuo said that she hopes to introduce the city she grew up in to more people, so that others can grow to care for Hong Kong people’s fight for democracy and freedom.

“I used to miss home,” she said, “Now I am afraid of losing home.”

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