Foreigners Unfiltered | How Foreigners in Taiwan view President Tsai Ing-wen?

Incumbent President Tsai Ing-wen (NOWnews)
Incumbent President Tsai Ing-wen (NOWnews)

TAIPEI (The China Post) — The China Post interviewed two U.S. students and invited them to share their observations on the democracy in Taiwan and the reasons why they would support incumbent President Tsai Ing-wen.

Bénédicte Yenyi Mulumba, 22, American exchange student at NTU

Bénédicte Yenyi Mulumba, 22, American exchange student at NTU (Courtesy of Bénédicte)
Bénédicte Yenyi Mulumba, 22, American exchange student at NTU (Courtesy of Bénédicte)

Bénédicte Yenyi Mulumba, a 22-year-old American exchange student at the National Taiwan University (NTU), praised the legalization of same-sex marriage during President Tsai Ing-wen’s first term in office.

Bénédicte is a senior majoring in journalism with a minor in political science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in the U.S. She came to Taiwan as an exchange student for one semester. 

When asked about the presidential elections, Bénédicte said that though she wasn’t familiar with Taiwan’s elections because her stay in Taiwan was too short, she was happy that the LGBT bill was passed under Tsai’s term. 

As a feminist, Bénédicte said, “my immense joy has always been to know that a valiant woman has been ruling the country this long and has maintained it at a good pace.” 

Gregory, 29, graduate student at NTU

Gregory, 29, graduate student at NTU (Courtesy of Greg)
Gregory, 29, graduate student at NTU (Courtesy of Greg)

Gregory, a 29-year-old graduate student at National Taiwan University (NTU), has lived in Taiwan since 2018. 

When asked about his observations on the democracy in Taiwan, he said that the value of Taiwan’s history of democracy is “precious.” 

However, the constant threats from Beijing make the cross-strait relations more pressing and might cause more polarization among Taiwanese voters, he said. 

Against this backdrop, he said that he would support Tsai Ing-wen and the New Power Party (NPP) as “she was the only candidate of the three who has shown the courage to put her foot down on issues of sovereignty.”

He added: “As we’ve seen with Hong Kong recently, and as is the case with my home country, Puerto Rico — without sovereignty, there is far less hope for the people to improve and fewer options.”

Ask for his support for the NPP, he said that this is not only because he hopes the legislature to be more pluralistic but also because “the party has shown to be a much more reliable and trustworthy force than the KMT.”

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