Majority of new immigrants satisfied with Taiwan’s working conditions: poll

(CNA)
(CNA)

TAIPEI (CNA) — Most new immigrants in Taiwan are satisfied with the working conditions in the country, while some are facing challenges such as low pay and long work hours, according to a survey released Wednesday by the Ministry of the Interior.

The 2018 survey of new immigrants — people who arrived in the 1990s mainly from Southeast Asia and mainland China — found that 89.8 percent of them think favorably of the overall work environment in Taiwan.

However, 28.3 percent of new immigrant employees have had to deal with problems such as low pay and long work hours and issues related to their limited Chinese-language ability, according to the poll.

Among those seeking jobs, 17.7 percent have encountered difficulties due to language barriers, xenophobic discrimination, and lack of certain documentation, the survey found.

Meanwhile, the poll also showed that 6.1 percent of new immigrants hold professional aptitude licenses, compared with 3.3 percent in 2013.

Another 15.9 percent are interested in launching business startups and hope that the government will provide subsidies and offer training in that area, according to the survey.

At a news conference at which the survey was released, one immigrant said that when she arrived from Vietnam 15 years ago as a new bride, she gained admission to a university and also set about learning the Chinese language. Chung Hsiu-erh (鍾秀兒) said she is now a qualified interpreter and licensed Vietnamese-language tour guide and runs two restaurants in Taiwan.

She said the National Immigration Agency provided her with many resources, which helped her to adapt to Taiwan’s living and working environment.

The first survey of new immigrants was conducted in 2003 and has since then been carried out every five years, according to Deputy Minister of the Interior Chiu Chang-yueh (邱昌嶽).