How to watch annular solar eclipse?

Looking directly into the sun, even with or without an eclipse, can cause blindness and other permanent eye damage if you don’t wear proper eye protection

TAIPEI (The China Post) — People living in Taiwan can observe an annular solar eclipse on Sunday from 2:44 p.m. to 5:26 p.m., starting in Kinmen County and moving slowly toward Taitung County.

The complete “ring of fire” is expected to occur at around 4:10 p.m. to 4:15 p.m. for less than a minute, according to the Central Weather Bureau (CWB).

The occasion will be streamed live between 2:30 p.m. and 5:30 p.m. on June 21 by NOWnews’ YouTube channel. The next time an annular solar eclipse covering such a large percentage of the sun will not be visible until June 28, 2215.

Experts remind you that direct eye contact with the sun without proper eye protection can cause blindness or other permanent damage to the eyes.

“Looking directly into the sun, even with or without an eclipse, can cause blindness and other permanent eye damage if you don’t wear proper eye protection,” Chandana Jayaratne, Professor in Physics and Director, Astronomy and Space Science Unit, University of Colombo told The Island.

You need special protective spectacles or eclipse glasses to watch the sun safely or watch an eclipse. Normal sunglasses (even those that absorb ultraviolet radiation) will not adequately protect your eyes.

If you intend to take pictures of the eclipse with a photographic device, there are special solar filters that you can be added to ensure that the rest of the sunlight doesn’t damage your vision.

Experts remark that the sky will not get significantly darker, as is the case in a total solar eclipse. (NOWnews)

The safest way to indirectly track an eclipse is by using a pinhole camera that can be easily made at home. Take two pieces of cardboard to construct a pinhole camera. Drill a small hole in the center of each piece with a pin or pencil tip. Stay in the sun on your back.

On the one hand, hold the piece with the hole in the sun and place the other side (screen) behind or under. The sunlight will go through the hole and form an image on the screen. If necessary, a mirror can project this light spot into a darker wall.

“If you prefer to look directly at the sun, use welders’ glass with gauge 14 or higher dark filters, which can be purchased from a hardware shop or solar filters,” Prof. Jayaratne explained.

Even with filters, don’t look at the sun more than three minutes continuously. However, under COVID-19 situation mass gatherings are not recommended and it is better to stay home and observe the eclipse.”