Singer Wu Tsing-fong sobs in court hearing for accused copyright violation

Singer-songwriter Wu Tsing-fong (吳青峰) had faced trial in the Taipei District court accused of copyright infringement on Tuesday. (Courtesy of Universal Music Group)

TAIPEI (The China Post) — Singer-songwriter Wu Tsing-fong (吳青峰) faced trial in the Taipei District court accused of copyright infringement on Tuesday.

The frontman of the Taiwanese band Sodagreen was sued by former manager Lin Wei-che (林暐哲) for copyright infringement.

In October 2020, the Intellectual Property Court (智慧財產法院) ruled against Lin in a civil case.

Earlier in February 2020, the prosecutor ruled that as the 38-year-old singer had transferred the sound recording rights to Lin, Wu had violated the copyright law by singing and releasing the album without his former manager’s consent.

The case was heard again on Tuesday, with the defendant, Wu, and lawyers Huang Xiu-lan (黃秀蘭) and Edgar Tien (田振慶) in attendance, who witnessed the signing of the suspension agreement in December 2018.

When witnesses testified, Wu recalled the past and sobbed in court.

▲吳青峰在雲門舞集劇場舉辦「上下冊」演唱會。(圖/環球提供)
Singer-songwriter Wu Tsing-fong (吳青峰) had faced trial in the Taipei District court accused of copyright infringement on Tuesday. (Courtesy of Universal Music Group)

Huang testified that because the record producer Lin and Wu had an oral agreement about music authorization, there was no other statement in the consent form.

The prosecutor said that in August 2008, Wu signed a lyrics and soundtrack licensing contract.

The contract stipulates that during the contract period from October 1, 2008, to December 31, 2014, Wu would exclusively give the company permission to use his music works.

However, if an objection is not submitted in writing three months prior to the contract’s expiration date, the contract will be automatically extended for one year.

Wu informed Lin not to renew the contract by legal attest letter on October 26, 2018.

In response, Lin had sent him the legal attest letters on April 2 and April 9, 2019, that the contract was still valid because he did not object three months before the expiration of the contract.

However, Wu publicly sang music works from April 12 to September 6, 2019, violating the copyright law.